AAMA + IGMA have unified as of Jan. 1, 2020 to create the Fenestration and Glazing Industry Alliance, or FGIA. Learn More
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FGIA Releases New Surface Temperature Assessment for Condensation Evaluation of Exterior Wall Systems

The Fenestration and Glazing Industry Alliance (FGIA) has developed a new document providing a standard procedure for the measurement of surface temperatures to be used in the condensation evaluation of exterior walls under laboratory conditions. AAMA 501.9, Surface Temperature Assessment for Condensation Evaluation of Exterior Wall Systems, an FGIA standard, is now available for purchase.“AAMA 501.9 is another optional test that can be performed in conjunction with a project specific curtain wall mock-up,” said Greg McKenna (Kawneer), Vice Chair of the Wall Mock-up Condensation Evaluation...

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FGIA Updates Design Guide for Sloped Glazing and Skylights

The Fenestration and Glazing Industry Alliance (FGIA) has updated a crucial guide outlining the considerations necessary for choosing proper glass for non-residential skylight and sloped glazing applications based on the best industry practices and technology, as well as describes the minimum requirements for sloped glazing as specified in the International Building Code (IBC). AAMA GDSG-1, Design Guide for Sloped Glazing and Skylights, an FGIA standard, was last updated in 1987, when it was first created.“This design guide is intended to provide the responsible sloped glazing...

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FGIA Releases New Document for Determining THERM Finite Element Modeling Surface Temperatures

The Fenestration and Glazing Industry Alliance (FGIA) has released a new publication addressing aspects of the finite element (FE) thermal modeling process often used to predict interior surface temperatures on fenestration including non-residential windows, terrace and patio doors, curtain wall, storefront, and entrances. AAMA 515-19, Voluntary Procedure for Determination of Fenestration Surface Temperatures by THERM Finite Element Modeling, an FGIA standard, is now available for purchase in the FGIA online store.Per AAMA 515, condensation will occur on any interior surface that falls below the dew...

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Window & Door Magazine | Decoded Columns

No matter how stringent the building code or the underlying performance standard, proper installation is the ultimate key to performance quality of fenestration products. This can be more complicated than it may seem at first glance, owing to the variety of product configurations and the types of exterior walls into which they are to be installed.

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Door and Window Market Magazine | AAMA Analysis Columns

When it comes to channeling water across a building envelope from roof to ground, flashing and sealants are at the front line between fenestration units and critical weather resistant barriers (WRB). Two types of flashing have surfaced as prevalent: the self-adhering and liquid-applied varieties. That’s likely due to their relatively simple methods for application.

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Window & Door Magazine | Industry Watch Columns

More and more, architects are seeking ways to bring the outdoors in, melding a building seamlessly with its outdoor environment. Multi-panel door systems offer an increasingly popular way to accomplish this. Not only do multi-panel door systems offer aesthetic and health benefits due to improved indoor air quality and daylighting, technological improvements also allow these systems to occupy a greater area in the building envelope without compromising overall Yglesiasdoors. NAFS-17 specifies five different configurations and descriptions of how to designate folding door units of from two to five panels. In addition to testing for air infiltration, water penetration and structural performance under wind loading, folding doors are tested for deflection, force to latch, force to engage, thermoplastic corner weld strength, deglazing, and operating cycle/slam withstand.

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Window & Door Magazine | In the Trenches Columns

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, osha.gov, is often considered to be the police of workplace safety. OSHA sets rules and regulations, performs audits, issues fines and more, all in an effort to create safer workplaces. However, two OSHA recognition programs offer an opportunity for companies to bring in the Administration as a safety coach and team member, rather than just as a rule creator and enforcer.

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