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Residential code columns written by Julie Ruth (JRuth Code Consulting), AAMA's Code Consultant. The following articles were originally published in Window & Door Magazine.

2017 Issues

The Tiny House Movement: 2018 IRC to include appendix for tiny houses installed on a permanent foundation, August
"Most people consider owning a home to be the American dream. Typically, this home would include a kitchen, living room, dining room, family room, and multiple bedrooms and bathrooms. But some people dream of owning a “tiny home,” defined as a house that measures less than 400 square feet in area."

Update to Existing Referenced Standards, June/July
"Our review of the 2018 International Codes continues this month with a discussion about the update of existing referenced standards. There have been numerous instances where standards that were developed through meticulous adherence to ANSI or ASTM protocols were rejected due to concerns about the standard’s content."

Change is in the Air: Changes to Design Wind Pressures in the 2018 IRC, May
"The content of the 2018 International Building Code and 2018 International Residential Code has been finalized. We can now start to prepare for the potential impact of these new provisions in the marketplace."

A New Era: The Online Governmental Consensus Vote could change how codes are developed, March/April
"The Final Action for the International Code Council Group B Code cycle has finally been determined. It took longer than usual for the 2016 ICC Group B Code cycle because of the addition of the Online Governmental Consensus Vote after the conclusion of the Public Comment Hearings, but it did not take as long as it did for the 2015 ICC Group A Code cycle."

Research Required, January/February
"Americans fiercely value the right to individual opinions and beliefs, and our entrepreneurial spirit has been credited to this very characteristic. However, when it comes to the development of regulations for the built environment, let’s just say compliance would be a whole lot easier if, at least once in a while, everyone could agree on one best approach."